Dying Without a Will in Indiana – Part II: Indiana’s “Default” Estate Plan for Married Persons

First Marriage and no children:  Your surviving spouse will receive three-fourths (3/4ths) of your estate and your surviving parents will receive one-fourth (1/4) of your estate.  If your parents predecease you, then your surviving spouse will receive all of your estate.

Who does this default “plan” exclude?  In the event your parents survive you, your spouse is not fully provided for by your estate.  This plan also excludes everyone else for whom you may wish to provide, including your stepchildren, siblings, friends, and charities.

Married and children with your spouse:  Your surviving spouse will receive one-half (1/2) of your estate and your surviving children will share one-half (1/2) of your estate.

Who does this default “plan” exclude?  Neither your spouse nor your children are fully provided for by your estate.  This plan also excludes everyone else for whom you may wish to provide, including your parents, stepchildren, siblings, friends, and charities.

Second (or subsequent) Marriage, and no children with current spouse:  Your surviving spouse (who did not have children with you) will receive one-half (1/2) of your estate personal property, but only one-fourth (1/4th) of your net real estate.  Your surviving children (from a prior marriage) will share one-half (1/2) of your estate and three-fourths (3/4ths) of your net real estate.

Who does this default “plan” exclude?  Neither your spouse nor your children are fully provided for by your estate.  This plan also excludes everyone else for whom you may wish to provide, including your parents, stepchildren, siblings, friends, and charities.

Dying Without a Will: Indiana’s Default Estate Plan

Indiana law provides a “default” estate plan for you, if you do not have a Will at your death.   This is called an “intestate” estate.

Does Indiana’s default plan match your intentions to provide for your loved ones?  Here’s a guide to determine what the law would provide if you died without a Will in Indiana.

First, a look at your estate plan if you are not married:

Not Married and without children:  Indiana law provides for your estate to be distributed, in equal shares, to your surviving parents and siblings.  Each of your surviving parents will receive no less than one-fourth of your estate.

Who does this default “plan” exclude?  Everyone else.  Only your brothers and sisters (or their children, if a sibling dies before you) and your parents will receive your estate.  A significant other, regardless of years together, will be excluded, as will lifelong friends or caregivers.  Each sibling will be treated equally, regardless of whether your relationship with that sibling was a good one.

Not Married, with children:  Your children will receive your estate, in equal shares.

Who does this default “plan” exclude?  Again, everyone else.  Only your children, in equal shares, will receive an interest in your estate.

In either of these situations, dying intestate as an unmarried person means that friends, other relatives, significant others, and charities, are completely excluded from your “default” estate plan.