Execute Documents Online Remotely

We will soon be able to assist clients in executing their estate planning documents without meeting in person through use of remote online notary (“RON”), which will soon be available by the Indiana Secretary of State. Our team will take steps to have this service available to our clients as soon as it is available from the Indiana Secretary of State. Remote online notary will allow us to serve as remote online notary witnesses, and notarize documents virtually, without an in-person meeting.

Please contact my office with any questions. We’re excited to be able to offer this service to clients at this time of public health crisis and social distancing.

New Years Resolutions?

Is an estate planning tune up on your list of New Years Resolutions?

If yes, you’re in good company!

Check out this fun “punch list” from Above the Law: Estate Planning Resolutions For 2019: How To Be A Grown-Up In The New Year.

This is a great list and includes items I’ve written about here and here.  A short summary of their list:

  1. Write a Last Will and Testament.
  2. Make a Power of Attorney.
  3. Execute a Health Care Proxy.
  4. Purchase a life insurance policy.
  5. Check beneficiary designation forms.
  6. Consider long-term care and disability insurance.
  7. Consult with a financial advisor.
  8. Talk to your parents and grandparents about their estate plans.
  9. Consider burial options.
  10. Inventory your assets.

Finally Writing a Will

Here’s a journalist’s take on getting (his long put off) estate planning documents in place:

What it was Like to Finally Write My Will, by John Schwartz.

And here’s Mr. Schwartz’s “To Do” list from this piece.  Of course, I recommend always having a lawyer prepare your documents!

“Get a will. Really. Dying without one — “intestate” — is a drag for everyone.

Get a lawyer. Unless your life is wonderfully uncomplicated, you’ll want the help of an adviser. Even if you do it yourself, have an attorney look over your work.

Decide on your beneficiaries, and make sure your insurance policies and other investments are in agreement with what your will says.

Name an executor. It’s a tough and thankless job, so get someone with good judgment; this person can be paid out of your estate.

Got young kids? Name a guardian. If not, the courts will appoint one; why not take care of this essential matter ahead of time?

Secure your paperwork. Once the documents are done, put them in a safe place and make sure your relatives know how to find it.

Revisit it every five years. The world changes; your will should, too.”

This is a great starting list, but I also add:

Get Advanced Directives.  Have decision makers in place in the event of incapacity.

Put a Trust in Place for Minors.  Make sure you protect your children’s inheritance until they are at mature ages.

Prince – Dying Without A Will?

The recent passing of music legend Prince serves as yet another reminder to get your estate plan in place.  As reported in the press, Prince’s sister has filed papers with the Court alleging that her brother died without a will.  Dying without a will in place is called “intestate.”  You can find my summary of Indiana’s intestate laws, here and here.  The intestate laws act as a default estate plan, and very likely may not include all of your intentions.

In Prince’s case, it has been widely reported about his great business abilities and his strong desire to be in control of his music and his public image.  It also appears Prince was generous and was a benefactor to many charitable organizations. If Prince truly did not have a Last Will & Testament (and this remains to be seen), then his great desire for control over his art and his charitable intent will not be realized now that he has passed.  A true loss of opportunity for his great legacy.

For the rest of us, this is a reminder that it is never too early to plan and make sure our intentions will be followed.

An Estate Planning Reminder for Parents with Minor Children

I just tweeted an article by a Boston financial planner, Dee Lee, who discusses the importance of parents with minor children getting their estate plans in place.  I strongly feel that setting up an estate plan with protections for minor children is just as important as the other aspects of parenting for which we take so much care and concern.  I have written about this here and here.   Just like finding the right pediatrician, car seat, and child care, an estate plan is an essential protection for your children.  This writer said it so well, that I am posting here some highlights — and  a good reminder — from her article:

“Experts estimate that less than 35% of individuals have wills. This is one thing people procrastinate about, especially parents with young children.

These parents are focused on the safety issues around their home to keep the kids safe but have not done any estate planning to keep the kids safe if something should happen to them.

At the very least, you need a will naming guardians for your children if something should happen to you and your spouse.

Without a will you are leaving behind a messy situation to be handle by whoever the court appoints. And if there is life insurance involved I can guarantee even your cousin Vinny will offer to take the kids.”

By Dee Lee, Where There’s a Will, There’s A Way, August 27, 2015

 

 

A Celebrity’s Daughter’s Death and Estate Planning for Young Adults

A few weeks ago, I wrote about the importance of having your now adult child get his or her estate planning documents prepared.  The idea may seem unnecessary at first blush — your now 18 year old (or twenty-something) “adult” child has just reached the legal age of adulthood and likely has yet to accumulate significant assets.  He or she may in many ways seem still like a child to you, and not yet ready for important adult documents.  However, under the law, they are adults, and you are no longer their default decisionmaker nor are you automatically granted access to your adult child’s medical records.  This is an important time for your child to designate whom he or she wishes to make these types of decisions.

A celebrity death serves as reminder to us of all the necessity of getting these documents in place.  Bobbi Kristina Brown, the twenty-two year old daughter of Whitney Houston and Bobby Brown, died recently after several months in a comatose state.  You can read more about the tragic story here and here.  Unfortunately, her lack of incapacity planning documentation and resulting legal protections (not unusual, given her age) resulted in a family legal fight during her incapacity.  A reminder to talk with your young adult children about the necessity of getting, at a minimum, their incapacity documents in place under the counsel of an estate planning attorney.

Estate Planning for Parents of Young Children

This is a topic of much passion for me.  Estate planning is a necessary protection for all parents with minor children.  Yet, national surveys reveal that less than 40 percent of Americans with children under the age of 18 have their estate planning documents in place.  (LexisNexis 2011 EZLaw Survey).

As a parent with young children myself, I understand that it may seem impossible to find the time to meet with a lawyer and get estate planning documents in place.  Life is busy!  Estate planning often seems like something that can wait to another, less hectic time.  Or, some parents, especially those with young children and just beginning their careers, feel that they have not yet accumulated sufficient assets to warrant the need for such a plan.  And, if I’m being honest, although I personally find estate planning to be a topic of great interest, most people do not particularly enjoy the topic or find it unsettling.  Who wants to talk about planning for death?

Estate planning is necessary!  It is as important as the other basic protections we have in place for our children and loved ones.  Here’s why:

1. Avoiding Intestate Distribution.  You likely do not want your Estate distributed according to the “intestate” or default distribution plans put in place by Indiana Probate law.

2.  Naming a Guardian For Minor Children.  You will want to name an individual(s) to care for your children in the event that both parents should pass.  In the absence of a written appointment by the minor’s parents (through a Last Will & Testament or other document), the Court will select a Guardian, most likely choosing among surviving family members who seek the appointment, and without the benefit of instruction from the child’s parents.

3.  Putting in Place a Plan to Manage Your Children’s Inheritance.  If something should happen to you (and your spouse) while your children are minors, you will want to put into place a trust to manage and distribute your children’s inheritance.  Without such a plan, the Court will appoint a custodian to manage the money while your child is a minor and, in most cases, your child will receive her inheritance outright at the age of 18.  Planning with trusts will allow you to put in place the management of your child’s inheritance until ages you determine are appropriate for distributions, holding it in trust beyond the age of 18.  In addition to managing and investing the inheritance funds, the trustee will use the inheritance to provide for your child’s care, support and education until the ages of distribution.

4. Planning with Beneficiary Designations.  An estate planning lawyer will help you set up your beneficiary designations to fully take advantage of trusts you put in place for the protection of your minor children.  Without such properly worded designations, your children will receive assets such as life insurance, 401(k)s, and IRAs, outright at the age of 18, and not protected by trust.

5.  Planning for Incapacity.  In addition to protecting your family in the event of death, an estate plan should also include incapacity planning documents, including a General Durable Power of Attorney, Living Will, and Appointment of Health Care Representative.  If you should become disabled or incapacitated, these documents will be essential to the continued function of your family and eliminate the public and potentially expensive and time-consuming process of a guardianship.

6.  Other Concerns.  A solid estate plan (and counsel of an estate planning attorney) affords other protections.  Additional topics that may be relevant to you and your family include Federal Estate Tax, avoidance of probate, second (or subsequent) marriages, blended families, children with disabilities requiring long-term care, and capital gains/income tax planning.

 

Dying Without a Will in Indiana – Part II: Indiana’s “Default” Estate Plan for Married Persons

First Marriage and no children:  Your surviving spouse will receive three-fourths (3/4ths) of your estate and your surviving parents will receive one-fourth (1/4) of your estate.  If your parents predecease you, then your surviving spouse will receive all of your estate.

Who does this default “plan” exclude?  In the event your parents survive you, your spouse is not fully provided for by your estate.  This plan also excludes everyone else for whom you may wish to provide, including your stepchildren, siblings, friends, and charities.

Married and children with your spouse:  Your surviving spouse will receive one-half (1/2) of your estate and your surviving children will share one-half (1/2) of your estate.

Who does this default “plan” exclude?  Neither your spouse nor your children are fully provided for by your estate.  This plan also excludes everyone else for whom you may wish to provide, including your parents, stepchildren, siblings, friends, and charities.

Second (or subsequent) Marriage, and no children with current spouse:  Your surviving spouse (who did not have children with you) will receive one-half (1/2) of your estate personal property, but only one-fourth (1/4th) of your net real estate.  Your surviving children (from a prior marriage) will share one-half (1/2) of your estate and three-fourths (3/4ths) of your net real estate.

Who does this default “plan” exclude?  Neither your spouse nor your children are fully provided for by your estate.  This plan also excludes everyone else for whom you may wish to provide, including your parents, stepchildren, siblings, friends, and charities.

Dying Without a Will: Indiana’s Default Estate Plan

Indiana law provides a “default” estate plan for you, if you do not have a Will at your death.   This is called an “intestate” estate.

Does Indiana’s default plan match your intentions to provide for your loved ones?  Here’s a guide to determine what the law would provide if you died without a Will in Indiana.

First, a look at your estate plan if you are not married:

Not Married and without children:  Indiana law provides for your estate to be distributed, in equal shares, to your surviving parents and siblings.  Each of your surviving parents will receive no less than one-fourth of your estate.

Who does this default “plan” exclude?  Everyone else.  Only your brothers and sisters (or their children, if a sibling dies before you) and your parents will receive your estate.  A significant other, regardless of years together, will be excluded, as will lifelong friends or caregivers.  Each sibling will be treated equally, regardless of whether your relationship with that sibling was a good one.

Not Married, with children:  Your children will receive your estate, in equal shares.

Who does this default “plan” exclude?  Again, everyone else.  Only your children, in equal shares, will receive an interest in your estate.

In either of these situations, dying intestate as an unmarried person means that friends, other relatives, significant others, and charities, are completely excluded from your “default” estate plan.

Four Essential Documents

Estate planning can sometimes appear complicated, full of acronyms and sophisticated sounding concepts. While it is true that estate planning can be complicated, in its simplest form, an Indiana estate plan should consist of at least the following four documents:

  1. Last Will and Testament. In its most basic form, your Will provides for you to direct the distribution of your assets titled to your name individually upon your death and appoint a person (or persons) to administer your estate upon your death. If you die without a Will, assets titled in your individual name may be subject to intestate administration.
  1. Appointment of Health Care Representative. Also called Health Care Proxy and Health Care Power of Attorney, this document provides for the appointment of a person (or persons) to make medical decisions for you in the event that you are incapacitated and unable to make decisions for yourself.
  1. General Durable Power of Attorney. In your General Durable Power of Attorney, you name a person (or persons) to make financial decisions for you in the event of your incapacity.
  1. Living Will. Your Living Will allows you to state your preferences regarding end of life decisions in the event of an incurable illness or persistent vegetative state.